[image-guide] Sync openstack-images.rst with other pages

Update per I9cfdf6b75bd3e47a354b3d4095209f7f3c0aaf48.

Change-Id: Ied7d1caafa1f87f9428c8ef17e460d772ae626d1
changes/09/461109/1
Petr Kovar 6 years ago
parent 121b7a06f3
commit a68c14b2f9

@ -82,20 +82,21 @@ Then, during the boot process, you must:
* Resize the root volume file system.
The simplest way to support this is to install in your image the:
* `cloud-utils <https://launchpad.net/cloud-utils>`_ package,
which contains the ``growpart`` tool for extending partitions.
* `cloud-initramfs-growroot <https://launchpad.net/cloud-initramfs-tools>`_
package for Ubuntu, Debian and Fedora, which supports resizing
root partition on the first boot.
* ``cloud-initramfs-growroot`` package for CentOS and RHEL.
* `cloud-init <https://launchpad.net/cloud-init>`__ package.
Depending on your distribution, the simplest way to support this is to install
in your image:
* the `cloud-init <https://launchpad.net/cloud-init>`__ package,
* the `cloud-utils <https://launchpad.net/cloud-utils>`_ package,
which, on Ubuntu and Debian, also contains the ``growpart`` tool for
extending partitions,
* if you use Fedora, CentOS 7, or RHEL 7, the ``cloud-utils-growpart``
package, which contains the ``growpart`` tool for extending partitions,
* if you use Ubuntu or Debian, the
`cloud-initramfs-growroot <https://launchpad.net/cloud-initramfs-tools>`_
package , which supports resizing root partition on the first boot.
With these packages installed, the image performs the root partition
resize on boot. For example, in the ``/etc/rc.local`` file.
These packages are in the Ubuntu and Debian package repository, as well as
the EPEL repository (for Fedora/RHEL/CentOS/Scientific Linux guests).
If you cannot install ``cloud-initramfs-tools``, Robert Plestenjak
has a GitHub project called `linux-rootfs-resize
@ -103,7 +104,7 @@ has a GitHub project called `linux-rootfs-resize
that contains scripts that update a ramdisk by using
``growpart`` so that the image resizes properly on boot.
If you can install the cloud-utils and ``cloud-init`` packages,
If you can install the ``cloud-init`` and ``cloud-utils`` packages,
we recommend that when you create your images, you create
a single ext3 or ext4 partition (not managed by LVM).
@ -199,18 +200,21 @@ Use cloud-init to fetch the public key
The ``cloud-init`` package automatically fetches the public key
from the metadata server and places the key in an account.
The account varies by distribution.
On Ubuntu-based virtual machines, the account is called ``ubuntu``.
On Fedora-based virtual machines, the account is called ``ec2-user``.
On Ubuntu-based virtual machines, the account is called ``ubuntu``,
on Fedora-based virtual machines, the account is called ``fedora``,
and on CentOS-based virtual machines, the account is called ``centos``.
You can change the name of the account used by ``cloud-init``
by editing the ``/etc/cloud/cloud.cfg`` file and adding a line
with a different user. For example, to configure ``cloud-init``
to put the key in an account named ``admin``, edit the
configuration file so it has the line:
to put the key in an account named ``admin``, use the following syntax
in the configuration file:
.. code-block:: yaml
user: admin
users:
- name: admin
(...)
Write a custom script to fetch the public key
---------------------------------------------
@ -301,7 +305,8 @@ Ensure image writes boot log to console
You must configure the image so that the kernel writes
the boot log to the ``ttyS0`` device. In particular, the
``console=ttyS0`` argument must be passed to the kernel on boot.
``console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8`` arguments must be passed to
the kernel on boot.
If your image uses ``grub2`` as the boot loader,
there should be a line in the grub configuration file.
@ -309,17 +314,17 @@ For example, ``/boot/grub/grub.cfg``, which looks something like this:
.. code-block:: console
linux /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-49-virtual root=UUID=6d2231e4-0975-4f35-a94f-56738c1a8150 ro console=ttyS0
linux /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-49-virtual root=UUID=6d2231e4-0975-4f35-a94f-56738c1a8150 ro console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8
If ``console=ttyS0`` does not appear, you must modify your grub
configuration. In general, you should not update the ``grub.cfg``
directly, since it is automatically generated.
If ``console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8`` does not appear, you must
modify your grub configuration. In general, you should not update the
``grub.cfg`` directly, since it is automatically generated.
Instead, you should edit the ``/etc/default/grub`` file and modify the
value of the ``GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT`` variable:
.. code-block:: bash
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="console=ttyS0"
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8"
Next, update the grub configuration. On Debian-based
operating systems such as Ubuntu, run this command:

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