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Reformat opencommunity.rst

Add markup for headings and definition lists to better visualize the
structure of the document.

Change-Id: I89f1871643667eeed917b18431c99d85682cd737
changes/93/618493/2
Andreas Jaeger 3 years ago
parent
commit
eca2db19a5
  1. 296
      doc/source/opencommunity.rst

296
doc/source/opencommunity.rst

@ -86,27 +86,33 @@ that drives away contributors who aren't "tough enough" to handle the it.
A base framework for an Open Community governance would balance 4 basic rules:
Contributor-driven bodies It is critical that the people contributing code,
documentation, usage experience, mentoring time or any other form of
contribution to the project are aligned with the leadership of the project.
Without contributor-driven bodies, leadership and contributors gradually drift
apart, to the point where the contributors no longer feel like their leadership
represents them, making the disruptive decision to fork the project under a
new, contributor-aligned governance, generally leaving the old governance body
with a trademark and an empty shell to govern.
Allowing for replacement Nobody should be appointed for life, as life will
change people. Contributors should regularly be consulted, and the governance
should generally encourage turnover.
Distinct groups call for distinct governance bodies If a community is made of
disjoint groups with little to no overlap in membership, and those groups all
need decisions to be made, then they probably need to each have their own
governance body at that level.
Avoid vanity governance bodies There is no point in having a governance body
where there is nothing to govern and no decision needed. Not every group of
people in a community needs a governance body.
Contributor-driven bodies
It is critical that the people contributing code, documentation,
usage experience, mentoring time or any other form of contribution to
the project are aligned with the leadership of the project.
Without contributor-driven bodies, leadership and contributors
gradually drift apart, to the point where the contributors no longer
feel like their leadership represents them, making the disruptive
decision to fork the project under a new, contributor-aligned
governance, generally leaving the old governance body with a
trademark and an empty shell to govern.
Allowing for replacement
Nobody should be appointed for life, as life will change people.
Contributors should regularly be consulted, and the governance should
generally encourage turnover.
Distinct groups call for distinct governance bodies
If a community is made of
disjoint groups with little to no overlap in membership, and those groups all
need decisions to be made, then they probably need to each have their own
governance body at that level.
Avoid vanity governance bodies
There is no point in having a governance body where there is nothing
to govern and no decision needed. Not every group of people in a
community needs a governance body.
There is no one-size-fits-all implementation of those basic rules that would
work for any project. The size of the project is a critical difference.
@ -127,21 +133,25 @@ give anyone a tie-breaking specific power.
Some of the things that indicate a healthy community are:
Diversity & inclusiveness Nowhere are the three forces (developers, users,
ecosystem) more important than when dealing with diversity and inclusiveness.
Providing an inclusive and safe experience for everyone, regardless of gender,
sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race,
nationality or religion is not only critical to the health of the entire open
source community, it's something that must be considered at the beginning of a
project.
Code of Conduct A code of conduct may not seem necessary as your community is
getting its start. However, creating a path for conflict identification and
resolution at the start can head off issues before they balloon out of control
and alienate valuable contributors and community members. Make the code of
conduct carefully crafted, but also prominent, part of larger strategy to be
inclusive and diverse. The OpenStack Foundation initially adopted the Ubuntu
Code of Conduct when establishing its own.
Diversity & inclusiveness
Nowhere are the three forces (developers, users, ecosystem) more
important than when dealing with diversity and inclusiveness.
Providing an inclusive and safe experience for everyone, regardless
of gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body
size, race, nationality or religion is not only critical to the
health of the entire open source community, it's something that must
be considered at the beginning of a project.
Code of Conduct
A code of conduct may not seem necessary as your community is getting
its start. However, creating a path for conflict identification and
resolution at the start can head off issues before they balloon out
of control and alienate valuable contributors and community members.
Make the code of conduct carefully crafted, but also prominent, part
of larger strategy to be inclusive and diverse. The OpenStack
Foundation initially adopted the Ubuntu Code of Conduct when
establishing its own.
The first lesson learned is the enforcement policy is equally as important
as the code of conduct. We did not put enough thought into how it was
@ -152,13 +162,14 @@ Code of Conduct when establishing its own.
a strong message to the community that you have thought through the process
and are looking out for their best interest.
Representation? A few years into the project, we worked with the community,
including the Diversity Working Group, to publicly document an enforcement
policy. Again, we looked to another successful open source community, Python
and PyCon, as a basis for our policy. This policy gives anyone who wants to
report an issue a clear call to action and sets expectations for how it will be
handled and gives the Foundation staff a clear process to follow and removes
the emotion from the process.
Representation? A few years into the project, we worked with the
community, including the Diversity Working Group, to publicly
document an enforcement policy. Again, we looked to another
successful open source community, Python and PyCon, as a basis for
our policy. This policy gives anyone who wants to report an issue a
clear call to action and sets expectations for how it will be handled
and gives the Foundation staff a clear process to follow and removes
the emotion from the process.
Check the health of your community as you go. Do you have something similar
to the following?
@ -185,8 +196,10 @@ geographical and by organization, can help reinforce this participation and
will ultimately make for a stronger community.
Contributor Recognition & Motivation
------------------------------------
Communication
-------------
Is there anything more emblematic of the modern work-force than attempting to
solve the problem of day-to-day communication? Open source communities face
@ -222,90 +235,117 @@ messaging. This can include local user groups, regional meet-ups,
international/national summits, developer mid-cycles. All can be used to
further educate and engage your open source community.
Branding & positioning (example of collaboration across forces, product
definition) including tools and processes Develop with stake-holders, open to
community Some degree of collaboration is useful and necessary, but only to an
extent. This is especially true in regards to visual identity since it can be
Branding & positioning
----------------------
Branding and positioning is an example of collaboration across forces
and product definition including tools and processes.
Develop with stake-holders, open to community Some degree of
collaboration is useful and necessary, but only to an extent. This is
especially true in regards to visual identity since it can be
subjective and contentious. Design rationale should be provided to the
community to build consensus, but there should be key decision makers to
prevent the ideation process from continuing to infinity. Lessons learned with
project mascots In an attempt to provide consistency we discovered removed
individuality with some projects Slippery slope - Once the projects got them,
every small group also wanted their own mascot Upside - These are actually
picked up and used regularly by the press and in group events. Critical to
develop brand guidelines, to give community guidelines to extend brand beyond
internal resources Development of consistent UX to be applied to web-sites,
documentation, etc.... This can be tough b/c the needs of the design team
don't always mesh with the needs/methods of developers managing properties like
documentation. Design must be available as an easy plug in (HTML or javascript
snippet) for headers and footers of sites.
Marketing & Strategy Once the initial branding and positioning has been
finalized, share with all key stake-holders. The challenge is often identifying
the correct channel to ensure everyone is apprised of updates and changes. This
may take time, but trying different options and even a combination of a
few often helps reinforce the messaging and branding for the maximum impact.
Ahead of the start of the year, identify the largest areas of opportunity to
increase brand visibility and favorability to create a strategy. After
identifying programs, events and projects that can support the strategy,
communicate this back to the community, reaching out to the marketing teams at
the ecosystem companies directly to participate and provide feedback. This is
your biggest opportunity for a ripple effect. Stay apprised of market share
and user adoption metrics. Share these metrics openly and broadly, particularly
with the ecosystem companies and elected officials who represent the three
forces. This can be done in joint leadership meetings, both remote and in
person, as well as mailing list newsletters. If the information could be
perceived negatively, come prepared with a solution or action plan to increase
confidence of key stake-holders. It's important to pro-actively share the
negative information when possible to prevent reactionary fear, uncertainty and
doubt. Identify key dates and milestones that celebrate the successes of the
community. Whether it's specific to a force, like a software release or new
case study or specific to the software or community itself, like results in a
market report or participation in a supported event. This helps create momentum
and rewards the positive community efforts that are impacting another force or
even the broader industry. Leverage collaborative opportunities when possible.
If the broader market perceptions indicate a confusion around facts that affect
one of the three forces, collect the people most affected to identify a way to
pro-actively address the problem. An example would be that OpenStack is seen as
only a private cloud solution. A Public Cloud Working Group that
collaborates to create programs and most recently messaging that will help
alleviate the confusion is a response that helps leverage the affected parties
to address the overarching issue.
Events Support upstream developers with dedicated space and events to
collaborate and get work done. This includes collaboration within a project and
cross-project collaboration. Create a productive event that combines upstream
developers with operators so that production challenges and successes can be
combined with software road-maps and bug tracking. Create an opportunity for
ecosystem companies to interact with operators and developers to educate around
available products, gain insights from the market and participate in road-map
discussions. Identify gaps in both the community and the overall market and
use events as an opportunity to gather content, subject matter experts and
adjacent communities to share knowledge and solve problems. OpenStack Days
Industry events
Education & On-boarding Goal to make the barrier to entry as low as possible.
Clear, discoverable and digestible documentation Recorded and real time
on-boarding sessions - webinars, f2f sessions at events Suggest training the
trainer - creating a toolbox and guidelines to provide to regional community
members so they can lead their own on-boarding sessions Documented ways to
communicate with seasoned experts / join meetings to accelerate on-boarding.
Mentorship programs
Ambassadors & Meet-ups Supporting global communities through user groups,
ambassador program, Providing resources & content for events and meet-ups, and
setting precedents for those events (branding, content, etc.), while still
giving them creative freedom building the relationships first; find leaders
outside of the Foundation to foster new user groups leaders; collab sessions at
Summits using tools available to all regions community of 90,000; team of 23
(XX ambassadors, 100+ user groups) Collaborating with local leaders to better
understand regional differences in the technology choices, use cases and
community involvement. Create a way to co-own user group contacts to ease the
transfer of ownership if people leave the community or if there are any bad
actors.
Cross-community collaboration (NIH) From the very beginning invite other
communities and projects to collaborate and participate. In turn actively reach
out to engage and participate in other communities to enhance integration
efforts. Need examples here
community to build consensus, but there should be key decision makers
to prevent the ideation process from continuing to infinity. Lessons
learned with project mascots In an attempt to provide consistency we
discovered removed individuality with some projects Slippery slope -
Once the projects got them, every small group also wanted their own
mascot Upside - These are actually picked up and used regularly by the
press and in group events. Critical to develop brand guidelines, to
give community guidelines to extend brand beyond internal resources
Development of consistent UX to be applied to web-sites,
documentation, etc.... This can be tough b/c the needs of the design
team don't always mesh with the needs/methods of developers managing
properties like documentation. Design must be available as an easy
plug in (HTML or javascript snippet) for headers and footers of sites.
Marketing & Strategy
--------------------
Once the initial branding and positioning has been finalized, share
with all key stake-holders. The challenge is often identifying the
correct channel to ensure everyone is apprised of updates and changes.
This may take time, but trying different options and even a
combination of a few often helps reinforce the messaging and branding
for the maximum impact. Ahead of the start of the year, identify the
largest areas of opportunity to increase brand visibility and
favorability to create a strategy. After identifying programs, events
and projects that can support the strategy, communicate this back to
the community, reaching out to the marketing teams at the ecosystem
companies directly to participate and provide feedback. This is your
biggest opportunity for a ripple effect. Stay apprised of market share
and user adoption metrics. Share these metrics openly and broadly,
particularly with the ecosystem companies and elected officials who
represent the three forces. This can be done in joint leadership
meetings, both remote and in person, as well as mailing list
newsletters. If the information could be perceived negatively, come
prepared with a solution or action plan to increase confidence of key
stake-holders. It's important to pro-actively share the negative
information when possible to prevent reactionary fear, uncertainty and
doubt. Identify key dates and milestones that celebrate the successes
of the community. Whether it's specific to a force, like a software
release or new case study or specific to the software or community
itself, like results in a market report or participation in a
supported event. This helps create momentum and rewards the positive
community efforts that are impacting another force or even the broader
industry. Leverage collaborative opportunities when possible. If the
broader market perceptions indicate a confusion around facts that
affect one of the three forces, collect the people most affected to
identify a way to pro-actively address the problem. An example would
be that OpenStack is seen as only a private cloud solution. A Public
Cloud Working Group that collaborates to create programs and most
recently messaging that will help alleviate the confusion is a
response that helps leverage the affected parties to address the
overarching issue.
Events
------
Support upstream developers with dedicated space and events to
collaborate and get work done. This includes collaboration within a
project and cross-project collaboration. Create a productive event
that combines upstream developers with operators so that production
challenges and successes can be combined with software road-maps and
bug tracking. Create an opportunity for ecosystem companies to
interact with operators and developers to educate around available
products, gain insights from the market and participate in road-map
discussions. Identify gaps in both the community and the overall
market and use events as an opportunity to gather content, subject
matter experts and adjacent communities to share knowledge and solve
problems. OpenStack Days Industry events
Education & On-boarding
-----------------------
Goal to make the barrier to entry as low as possible. Clear,
discoverable and digestible documentation Recorded and real time
on-boarding sessions - webinars, f2f sessions at events Suggest
training the trainer - creating a toolbox and guidelines to provide
to regional community members so they can lead their own on-boarding
sessions Documented ways to communicate with seasoned experts / join
meetings to accelerate on-boarding. Mentorship programs
Ambassadors & Meet-ups
----------------------
Supporting global communities through user groups, ambassador
program, Providing resources & content for events and meet-ups, and
setting precedents for those events (branding, content, etc.), while
still giving them creative freedom building the relationships first;
find leaders outside of the Foundation to foster new user groups
leaders; collab sessions at Summits using tools available to all
regions community of 90,000; team of 23 (XX ambassadors, 100+ user
groups) Collaborating with local leaders to better understand
regional differences in the technology choices, use cases and
community involvement. Create a way to co-own user group contacts to
ease the transfer of ownership if people leave the community or if
there are any bad actors.
Cross-community collaboration (NIH)
-----------------------------------
From the very beginning invite other communities and projects to
collaborate and participate. In turn actively reach out to engage and
participate in other communities to enhance integration efforts. Need
examples here
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