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Update docs to clarify inheritance and global repo state

We did not clearly identify all of the exceptions to the standard
inheritance behavior ("override").  Nor did we explicitly indicate
that was the standard.  Correct that by adjusting the documentation
accordingly.

Also, we did not document the idea of a global repo state.  Correct
that as well.

Change-Id: If8848145bf353483df08c1ee6e3fcaafe572a2b6
changes/81/840381/2
James E. Blair 3 weeks ago
parent
commit
54f568d598
  1. 8
      doc/source/concepts.rst
  2. 64
      doc/source/config/job.rst
  3. 14
      doc/source/gating.rst

8
doc/source/concepts.rst

@ -53,8 +53,12 @@ substantially different than the git repo state of the change itself
since the repo may have merged other changes since the change was
originally authored). Items in a pipeline may depend on other items,
and if they do, all of their dependent changes will be included in the
git repo state that Zuul prepares. For more detail on this process,
see :ref:`project_gating` and :ref:`dependencies`.
git repo state that Zuul prepares. Jobs may also specify that they
require additional git repos, and if so, the repo state (as of the
time when the item was enqueued in the pipeline) for those repos will
also be included. For more detail on this process, see
:ref:`project_gating`, :ref:`dependencies`, and
:ref:`global_repo_state`.
The configuration for nearly everything described above is held in
files inside of the git repos upon which Zuul operates. Zuul's

64
doc/source/config/job.rst

@ -18,7 +18,10 @@ starting with very basic jobs which describe characteristics that all
jobs on the system should have, progressing through stages of
specialization before arriving at a particular job. A job may inherit
from any other job in any project (however, if the other job is marked
as :attr:`job.final`, jobs may not inherit from it).
as :attr:`job.final`, jobs may not inherit from it). Generally,
attributes on child jobs will override (or completely replace)
attributes on the parent, however some attributes are combined. See
the documentation for individual attributes for these exceptions.
A job with no parent is called a *base job* and may only be defined in
a :term:`config-project`. Every other job must have a parent, and so
@ -58,6 +61,7 @@ be:
* child playbook
* child post-run playbook
* parent post-run playbook
* parent cleanup-run playbook
Further inheritance would nest even deeper.
@ -146,6 +150,11 @@ Here is an example of two job definitions:
To indicate a job is not intended to be run directly, but
instead must be inherited from, set this attribute to ``true``.
Once this is set to ``true`` in a job it cannot be reset to
``false`` within the same job by other variants; however jobs
which inherit from it can (and by default do) reset it to
``false``.
.. warning::
It is possible to circumvent the use of `abstract` in an
@ -162,6 +171,11 @@ Here is an example of two job definitions:
*must* also be ``abstract``; a configuration error will be
raised if not.
Once this is set to ``true`` in a job it cannot be reset to
``false`` within the same job by other variants; however jobs
which inherit from it can (and by default do) reset it to
``false``.
For example, you may define a base abstract job `foo` and create
two abstract jobs that inherit from `foo` called
`foo-production` and `foo-development`. If it would be an error
@ -258,6 +272,10 @@ Here is an example of two job definitions:
by this job which may be used by other jobs for other changes
using the :attr:`job.requires` attribute.
When inheriting jobs or applying variants, the list of
`provides` is extended (`provides` specified in a job definition
are added to any supplied by their parents).
.. attr:: requires
A list of free-form strings which identify resources which may
@ -277,6 +295,10 @@ Here is an example of two job definitions:
returned by the `provides` jobs will be made available to the
`requires` job.
When inheriting jobs or applying variants, the list of
`requires` is extended (`requires` specified in a job definition
are added to any supplied by their parents).
For example, a job which produces a builder container image in
one project that is then consumed by a container image build job
in another project might look like this:
@ -488,6 +510,10 @@ Here is an example of two job definitions:
even when the job is canceled. Cleanup results are not taken into
account.
When a job inherits from a parent, the child's cleanup-run
playbooks are run before the parent's. See :ref:`job` for more
information.
.. attr:: run
The name of a playbook or list of playbooks for this job. If it
@ -539,15 +565,18 @@ Here is an example of two job definitions:
appear on the job -- roles earlier in the list will take
precedence over those which follow.
In the case of job inheritance or variance, the roles used for
each of the playbooks run by the job will be only those which
were defined along with that playbook. If a child job inherits
from a parent which defines a pre and post playbook, then the
pre and post playbooks it inherits from the parent job will run
only with the roles that were defined on the parent. If the
child adds its own pre and post playbooks, then any roles added
by the child will be available to the child's playbooks. This
is so that a job which inherits from a parent does not
This attribute is not overridden on inheritance or variance;
instead roles are added with each new job or variant. In the
case of job inheritance or variance, the roles used for each of
the playbooks run by the job will be only those which were
cumulatively defined up to that point in the inheritance
hierarchy where that playbook was added. If a child job
inherits from a parent which defines a pre and post playbook,
then the pre and post playbooks it inherits from the parent job
will run only with the roles that were defined on the parent.
If the child adds its own pre and post playbooks, then any roles
added by the child will be available to the child's playbooks.
This is so that a job which inherits from a parent does not
inadvertently alter the behavior of the parent's playbooks by
the addition of conflicting roles. Roles added by a child will
appear before those it inherits from its parent.
@ -625,9 +654,15 @@ Here is an example of two job definitions:
A list of other projects which are used by this job. Any Zuul
projects specified here will also be checked out by Zuul into
the working directory for the job. Speculative merging and
cross-repo dependencies will be honored.
cross-repo dependencies will be honored. If there is not a
change for the project ahead in the pipeline, its repo state as
of the time the item was enqueued will be frozen and used for
all jobs for a given change (see :ref:`global_repo_state`).
This attribute is a union of all applicable parents and variants.
This attribute is not overridden by inheritance; instead it is
the union of all applicable parents and variants (i.e., jobs can
expand but not reduce the set of required projects when they
inherit).
The format for this attribute is either a list of strings or
dictionaries. Strings are interpreted as project names,
@ -777,6 +812,11 @@ Here is an example of two job definitions:
any project's pipeline. Apply caution when doing so as other
projects may be able to expose the source project's secrets.
This attribute is not overridden by inheritance; instead it is
the intersection of all applicable parents and variants (i.e.,
jobs can reduce but not expand the set of allowed projects when
they inherit).
.. warning::
It is possible to circumvent the use of `allowed-projects` in

14
doc/source/gating.rst

@ -409,3 +409,17 @@ If a cycle is created by use of cross-project dependencies, Zuul will
abort its work very early. There will be no message in Gerrit and no
changes that are part of the cycle will be enqueued into any pipeline.
This is to protect Zuul from infinite loops.
.. _global_repo_state:
Global Repo State
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If a git repository is used by at least one job for a queue item, then
Zuul will freeze the repo state (i.e., branch heads and tags) and use
that same state for every job run for that queue item. Not every job
will get a git repo checkout of every repo, but for any repo that is
checked out, it will have the same state. Because of this, authors
can be sure that jobs running on the same queue item have a consistent
view of all involved git repos, even if one job starts running much
later than another.

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