Browse Source

Remove firehose.openstack.org

Once we are satisfied that we have disabled the inputs to firehose we
can land this change to stop managing it in config management. Once that
is complete the server can be removed.

Change-Id: I7ebd54f566f8d6f940a921b38139b54a9c4569d8
changes/26/786126/1
Clark Boylan 3 months ago
parent
commit
2eebb858af
  1. 366
      doc/source/firehose.rst
  2. 434
      doc/source/firehose_schema.rst
  3. 2
      doc/source/systems.rst
  4. 1
      hiera/common.yaml
  5. 7
      inventory/base/hosts.yaml
  6. 25
      inventory/service/group_vars/firehose.yaml
  7. 1
      inventory/service/group_vars/graphite.yaml
  8. 1
      inventory/service/group_vars/graphite_opendev.org
  9. 3
      inventory/service/groups.yaml
  10. 18
      manifests/site.pp
  11. 1
      modules/openstack_project/files/ssl_cert_check/ssldomains
  12. 87
      modules/openstack_project/manifests/firehose.pp
  13. 1
      playbooks/group_vars/certcheck.yaml
  14. 5
      playbooks/roles/install-ansible/files/inventory_plugins/test-fixtures/results.yaml

366
doc/source/firehose.rst

@ -1,366 +0,0 @@
:title: Firehose
.. _firehose:
Firehose
########
The unified message bus for Infra services.
At a Glance
===========
:Hosts:
* firehose*.openstack.org
:Puppet:
* https://opendev.org/opendev/puppet-mosquitto
* https://opendev.org/opendev/puppet-germqtt
* https://opendev.org/opendev/puppet-lpmqtt
* :git_file:`modules/openstack_project/manifests/firehose.pp`
:Projects:
* https://mosquitto.org/
* http://opendev.org/opendev/germqtt/
* http://opendev.org/opendev/lpmqtt/
Overview
========
The firehose is an infra run MQTT broker that is a place for any infra run
service to publish events to. The concept behind it is that if anything needs
to consume an event from an infra run service we should have a single place
to go for consuming them.
firehose.openstack.org hosts an instance of Mosquitto to be the MQTT broker
and also locally runs an instance of germqtt to publish the gerrit event
stream over MQTT and lpmqtt to publish a launchpad event stream over MQTT.
Connection Info
---------------
firehose.openstack.org has 2 open ports for MQTT traffic:
* **1883** - The default MQTT port
* **80** - Uses websockets for the MQTT communication
* **8883** - The default SSL/TLS MQTT port
* **443** - The SSL/TLS websockets port
Topics
------
Topics at a top level are set based on the name of the service publishing the
messages. The higher levels are specified by the publisher. For example::
gerrit/openstack-infra/germqtt/comment-added
is a typical message topic on firehose. The top level 'gerrit' specifies the
service the message is from, and the rest of the message comes from germqtt
(the daemon used for publishing the gerrit events)
MQTT topics are hierarchical and you can filter your subscription on part of the
hierarchy. `[1]`_
.. _[1]: https://mosquitto.org/man/mqtt-7.html
Services Publishing to firehose
-------------------------------
As of right now the following services publish messages to the firehose:
+-----------------+------------------+----------------------------+
| Service | Base Topic | Source of Messages |
+=================+==================+============================+
| ansible | ansible | `ansible_mqtt_plugin`_ |
+-----------------+------------------+----------------------------+
| gerrit | gerrit | `germqtt`_ |
+-----------------+------------------+----------------------------+
| launchpad | launchpad | `lpmqtt`_ |
+-----------------+------------------+----------------------------+
| subunit worker | gearman-subunit | `subunit-gearman-worker`_ |
+-----------------+------------------+----------------------------+
| logstash worker | gearman-logstash | `logstash-gearman-worker`_ |
+-----------------+------------------+----------------------------+
.. _germqtt: http://opendev.org/opendev/germqtt/
.. _lpmqtt: http://opendev.org/opendev/lpmqtt/
.. _subunit-gearman-worker: https://opendev.org/opendev/puppet-subunit2sql/src/branch/master/files/subunit-gearman-worker.py
.. _ansible_mqtt_plugin: https://opendev.org/opendev/system-config/src/branch/master/modules/openstack_project/files/puppetmaster/mqtt.py
.. _logstash-gearman-worker: https://opendev.org/opendev/puppet-log_processor/src/branch/master/files/log-gearman-worker.py
For a full schema description see :ref:`firehose_schema`
Client Usage
============
There is no outside access to publishing messages to the firehose available,
however anyone is able to subscribe to any topic services publish to. To
interact with the firehose you need to use the MQTT protocol. The specific
contents of the payload are dictated by the service publishing the
messages. So this section only covers how to subscribe and receive the messages
not how to consume the content received.
Available Clients
-----------------
The MQTT community wiki maintains a page that lists available client bindings
for many languages here: https://github.com/mqtt/mqtt.github.io/wiki/libraries
For python using the `paho-mqtt`_ library is recommended
.. _paho-mqtt: https://pypi.org/project/paho-mqtt/
CLI Example
-----------
The mosquitto project also provides both a CLI publisher and subscriber client
that can be used to easily subscribe to any topic and receive the messages. On
debian based distributions these are included in the mosquitto-clients package.
For example, to subscribe to every topic on the firehose you would run::
mosquitto_sub -h firehose.openstack.org --topic '#'
You can adjust the value of the topic parameter to make what you're subscribing
to more specific.
MQTT Protocol Example
---------------------
Interacting with firehose on the unencrypted MQTT port is normally pretty easy in
most language bindings. Here are some examples that will have the same behavior
as the CLI example above and will subscribe to all topics on the firehose and
print it to STDOUT.
Python
''''''
.. code-block:: python
import paho.mqtt.client as mqtt
def on_connect(client, userdata, flags, rc):
print("Connected with result code " + str(rc))
client.subscribe('#')
def on_message(client, userdata, msg):
print(msg.topic+" "+str(msg.payload))
# Create a websockets client
client = mqtt.Client()
client.on_connect = on_connect
client.on_message = on_message
# Connect to the firehose
client.connect('firehose.openstack.org')
# Listen forever
client.loop_forever()
Haskell
'''''''
This requires the `mqtt-hs`_ library to be installed.
.. _mqtt-hs: https://hackage.haskell.org/package/mqtt-hs
.. code-block:: haskell
{-# Language DataKinds, OverloadedStrings #-}
module Subscribe where
import Control.Concurrent
import Control.Concurrent.STM
import Control.Monad (unless, forever)
import System.Exit (exitFailure)
import System.IO (hPutStrLn, stderr)
import qualified Network.MQTT as MQTT
topic :: MQTT.Topic
topic = "#"
handleMsg :: MQTT.Message MQTT.PUBLISH -> IO ()
handleMsg msg = do
let t = MQTT.topic $ MQTT.body msg
p = MQTT.payload $ MQTT.body msg
print t
print p
main :: IO ()
main = do
cmds <- MQTT.mkCommands
pubChan <- newTChanIO
let conf = (MQTT.defaultConfig cmds pubChan)
{ MQTT.cHost = "firehose.openstack.org" }
_ <- forkIO $ do
qosGranted <- MQTT.subscribe conf [(topic, MQTT.Handshake)]
forever $ atomically (readTChan pubChan) >>= handleMsg
terminated <- MQTT.run conf
print terminated
Go
''
.. code-block:: go
package main
import (
"fmt"
MQTT "github.com/eclipse/paho.mqtt.golang"
"os"
"strconv"
"time"
)
func onMessageReceived(client MQTT.Client, msg MQTT.Message) {
fmt.Printf("TOPIC: %s\n", msg.Topic())
fmt.Printf("MSG: %s\n", msg.Payload())
}
func main() {
hostname, _ := os.Hostname()
opts := &MQTT.ClientOptions{
ClientID: hostname+strconv.Itoa(time.Now().Second()),
}
opts.AddBroker("tcp://firehose.openstack.org:1883")
opts.OnConnect = func(c MQTT.Client) {
if token := c.Subscribe("#", 0, onMessageReceived); token.Wait() && token.Error() != nil {
fmt.Println(token.Error())
os.Exit(1)
}
}
client := MQTT.NewClient(opts)
if token := client.Connect(); token.Wait() && token.Error() != nil {
panic(token.Error())
}
for {
time.Sleep(1 * time.Second)
}
}
Websocket Example
-----------------
In addition to using the raw MQTT protocol firehose.o.o provides a websocket
interface on port 80 that MQTT traffic can go through. This is especially useful
for web applications that intend to consume any events from MQTT. To see an
example of this in action you can try: http://mitsuruog.github.io/what-mqtt/
(the source is available here: https://github.com/mitsuruog/what-mqtt) and use
that to subscribe to any topics on firehose.openstack.org.
Another advantage of using websockets over port 80 is that it's much more
firewall friendly, especially in environments that are more locked down. If you
would like to consume events from the firehose and are concerned about a
firewall blocking your access, the websocket interface is a good choice.
You can also use the paho-mqtt python library to subscribe to mqtt over
websockets fairly easily. For example this script will subscribe to all topics
on the firehose and print it to STDOUT
.. code-block:: python
:emphasize-lines: 12,17
import paho.mqtt.client as mqtt
def on_connect(client, userdata, flags, rc):
print("Connected with result code " + str(rc))
client.subscribe('#')
def on_message(client, userdata, msg):
print(msg.topic+" "+str(msg.payload))
# Create a websockets client
client = mqtt.Client(transport="websockets")
client.on_connect = on_connect
client.on_message = on_message
# Connect to the firehose
client.connect('firehose.openstack.org', port=80)
# Listen forever
client.loop_forever()
Using SSL/TLS
-------------
If you would like to connect to the firehose using ssl to encrypt the events you
receive from MQTT you just need to connect with ssl enabled via either of the
encrypted ports. If you'd like to verify the server ssl certificate when
connecting you'll need to provide a CA bundle to use as most MQTT clients do
not know how to use the system trusted CA bundle like most http clients.
To connect to the firehose and subscribe to all topics you can use the
mosquitto CLI client::
mosquitto_sub --topic '#' -h firehose.openstack.org --cafile /etc/ca-certificates/extracted/tls-ca-bundle.pem -p 8883
You can use python:
.. code-block:: python
:emphasize-lines: 15,20
import paho.mqtt.client as mqtt
def on_connect(client, userdata, flags, rc):
print("Connected with result code " + str(rc))
client.subscribe('#')
def on_message(client, userdata, msg):
print(msg.topic+" "+str(msg.payload))
# Create an SSL encrypted websockets client
client = mqtt.Client()
client.tls_set(ca_certs='/etc/ca-certificates/extracted/tls-ca-bundle.pem')
client.on_connect = on_connect
client.on_message = on_message
# Connect to the firehose
client.connect('firehose.openstack.org', port=8883)
client.loop_forever()
Or with ruby:
.. code-block:: ruby
:emphasize-lines: 6,7,8
require 'rubygems'
require 'mqtt'
client = MQTT::Client.new
client.host = 'firehose.openstack.org'
client.ssl = true
client.cert_file = '/etc/ca-certificates/extracted/tls-ca-bundle.pem'
client.port = 8883
client.connect()
client.subscribe('#')
client.get do |topic,message|
puts message
end
Example Use Cases
=================
Event Notifications
-------------------
A common use case for the event bus is to get a notification when an event
occurs. There is an open source tool, `mqttwarn`_ that makes setting this up
off the firehose (or any other mqtt broker) very straightforward.
.. _mqttwarn: https://github.com/jpmens/mqttwarn
You can use mqttwarn to setup custom notifications to a large number of tools
and services. (both local and remote). You can read the full docs on how to
configure and use mqttwarn at https://github.com/jpmens/mqttwarn/wiki and
https://github.com/jpmens/mqttwarn/blob/master/README.md
IMAP and MX
===========
We're using Cyrus as an IMAP server in order to consume launchpad bug
events via email. The configuration of the admin password account and
creation of the lpmqtt user for Cyrus were completed using the
following::
$ sudo saslpasswd2 cyrus
$ cyradm --user=cyrus --server=localhost
Password:
localhost> create user.lpmqtt
An MX record has also been set up to point to the firehose server.

434
doc/source/firehose_schema.rst

@ -1,434 +0,0 @@
:title: Firehose Schema
.. _firehose_schema:
Firehose Schema
###############
This attempts to document the topic and payload schema for all the services
reporting to the firehose. However since much of what is reported to firehose
is dynamically generated it is possible this document misses a case.
Gerrit
======
Messages on firehose for gerrit are generated using the `germqtt`_ project. For
the most part these are basically identical to what gerrit returns on it's
native event stream except over MQTT.
.. _germqtt: http://opendev.org/opendev/germqtt/
Topics
------
The topics for gerrit are generated dynamically. However, they follow a fairly
straightforward pattern. The basic formula for this is::
gerrit/<git namespace>/<repo name>/<gerrit event>
So for example a typical topic would be::
gerrit/openstack/nova/comment-added
The ``git namespace`` and ``repo name`` are pretty self explanatory and are just
from the git repository the change in gerrit is for. The event is defined in the gerrit event stream. You can see the full reference for topics in the Gerrit
docs for `Gerrit events`_. However, for simplicity the possible values are:
* change-abandoned
* change-merged
* change-restored
* comment-added
* draft-published
* hashtags-changed
* merge-failed
* patchset-created
* ref-updated
* reviewer-added
* topic-changed
Payload
-------
The payload for gerrit messages are basically the same JSON that gets returned
by gerrit's event stream command. Instead of repeating the entire gerrit schema
doc here just refer to gerrit's docs on the `JSON payload`_ which documents the
contents of each JSON object and refer to the doc on `Gerrit events`_ for which
JSON objects are included with which event type.
.. _JSON payload: https://review.opendev.org/Documentation/json.html
.. _Gerrit events: https://review.opendev.org/Documentation/cmd-stream-events.html#events
Launchpad
=========
The messages sent to firehose for launchpad are generated using `lpmqtt`_
.. _lpmqtt: http://opendev.org/opendev/lpmqtt/
Topics
------
The topics for lpmqtt follow a pretty simple formula::
launchpad/<project>/<event type>/<bug number>
the ``project`` is the launchpad project name, ``event type`` will always be
"bug" (or not present). The intent of this was to be "bug" or "blueprint", but
due to limitations in launchpad getting notifications from blueprints is not
possible. The flexibility was left in the schema just in case this ever changes.
The ``bug number`` is obviously the bug number from launchpad.
It's also worth noting that only the base topic is a guaranteed field. Depending
on the notification email from launchpad some of the other fields may not be
present. In those cases the topic will be populated left to right until a
missing field is encountered.
Payload
-------
The payload of messages is dynamically generated and dependent on the
notification received from launchpad, and launchpad isn't always consistent in
what fields are present in those notifications.
However, for bug event types there is a standard format. The fields which
are always present for bugs (which should normally be the only message for
firehose) are:
* commenters
* bug-reporter
* bug-modifier
* bug-number
* event-type
The remaining fields are dynamic and depend on launchpad. An example message
payload (with the body trimmed) for a bug is::
{
"status": "Triaged",
"project": "octavia",
"assignee": "email@fakedomain.com",
"bug-reporter": "Full name (username)",
"event-type": "bug",
"bug-number": "1680938",
"commenters": ["username"]
"tags": ["rfe"],
"importance": "Medium",
"bug-modifier": "Full Name (username)",
"body": "notification body, often is just bug comment or summary",
}
Subunit Workers
===============
The messages for the subunit workers are generated directly in the
`subunit gearman worker scripts`_.
.. _subunit gearman worker scripts: https://opendev.org/opendev/puppet-subunit2sql/src/branch/master/files/subunit-gearman-worker.py
Topics
------
The topics for the subunit workers follow a simple pattern::
gearman-subunit/<worker hostname>/<git namespace/<repo name>/<change number>
Where ``worker hostname`` is the host which processed the subunit file, as
of right now there are 2, subunit-worker01 and subunit-worker02, but there may
be more (or fewer) in the future. The ``git namespace`` and ``repo name`` are
pretty self explanatory, and are just for the git repo under test that the
subunit was emitted from. ``change number`` is the gerrit change number for the
job that launched the tests the subunit is for.
Payload
-------
The payload for the messages from the subunit workers is pretty straightforward
json that contains 3 fields: ``status``, ``build_uuid``, and ``source_url``.
An example is::
{
'status': 'success',
'build_uuid': '45f7c1ddbfd74c6aba94662623bd61b8'
'source_url': 'A url',
}
Ansible
=======
We have mqtt events emitted from ansible being run on :ref:`bridge`.
These events are generated using a `MQTT Ansible Callback Plugin`_.
.. _MQTT Ansible Callback Plugin: https://opendev.org/opendev/system-config/src/branch/master/modules/openstack_project/files/puppetmaster/mqtt.py
Topics
------
The topics for ansible are a bit more involved than some of the other services
publishing to firehose. It depends on the type of event that ansible just
finished. There are 3 categories of events which have slightly different topic
formulas (and payloads).
Playbook Events
'''''''''''''''
Whenever a playbook action occurs the callback plugin will emit an event for
it. The topics for playbook events fall into this pattern::
ansible/playbook/<playbook uuid>/action/<playbook action>/<status>
``playbook uuid`` is pretty self explanatory here, it's the uuid ansible uses
to uniquely identify the playbook being run. ``playbook action`` is the action
that the event is for, this is either going to be ``start`` or ``finish``.
``status`` is only set on ``finish`` and will be one of the following:
* ``OK``
* ``FAILED``
to indicate whether the playbook successfully executed or not.
Playbook Stats Events
'''''''''''''''''''''
At the end of a playbook these events are emitted for each host that tasks were
run on. The topics for these events fall into the following pattern::
ansible/playbook/<playbook uuid>/stats/<hostname>
In this case ``playbook uuid`` is the same as above and the internal ansible
unique playbook identifier. ``hostname`` here is the host that ansible was
running tasks on as part of the playbook.
Task Events
'''''''''''
At the end of each individual task the callback plugin will emit an event. Those
events' topics fall into the following pattern::
ansible/playbook/<playbook uuid>/task/<hostname>/<status>
``playbook uuid`` is the same as in the previous 2 event types. ``hostname`` is
the hostname the task was executed on. ``status`` is the result of the task
and will be one of the following:
* ``OK``
* ``FAILED``
* ``UNREACHABLE``
Payload
-------
Just as with the topics the message payloads depend on the event type. Each
event uses a JSON payload with slightly different fields.
Playbook Events
'''''''''''''''
For playbook events the payload falls into this schema on playbook starts::
{
"status": "OK",
"host": <hostname>
"session": <session id>,
"playbook_name": <playbook name>,
"playbook_id": <playbook uuid>,
"ansible_type": "start",
}
When a playbook finishes the payload is slightly smaller and the schema is::
{
"playbook_id": <playbook uuid>,
"playbook_name": <playbook name>,
"status": <status>,
}
In both cases ``playbook uuid`` is the same field from the topic.
``playbook name`` is the human readable name for the playbook. If one is
set in the playbook this will be that. ``status`` will be whether the
playbook was successfully executed or not. It will always be ``OK`` on starts
(otherwise the event isn't emitted) but on failures, just like in the topic,
this will be one of the following:
* ``OK``
* ``FAILED``
``session id`` is a UUID generated by the callback plugin to uniquely identify
the execution of the playbook. ``hostname`` is the hostname where the ansible
playbook was launched. (which is not necessarily where tasks are being run)
An example of this from the system is for a start event::
{
"status": "OK",
"playbook_name": "localhost:!disabled",
"ansible_type": "start",
"host": "puppetmaster.openstack.org",
"session": "14d6e568-2c75-11e7-bd24-bc764e048db9",
"playbook_id": "5a95e9da-8d33-4dbb-a8b3-a77affc065d0"
}
and for a finish::
{
"status": "FAILED",
"playbook_name": "compute*.ic.openstack.org:!disabled",
"playbook_id": "b259ac6d-6cb5-4403-bb8d-0ff2131c3d7a"
}
Playbook Stats Events
'''''''''''''''''''''
The schema for stats events is::
{
"host": <hostname>,
"ansible_host": <execute hostname>,
"playbook_id": <playbook uuid>,
"playbook_name": <playbook name>,
"stats": {
"unreachable": int,
"skipped": int,
"ok": int,
"changed": int,
"failures": int,
}
}
``playbook uuid`` is the same field from the topic. ``playbook name`` is the
human readable name for the playbook. If one is set in the playbook this will be
that. ``execute hostname`` is the hostname where the tasks were being executed,
while ``hostname`` is the hostname where ansible launched the playbook. The
``stats`` subdict contains the task status counts where the key is the tasks
statuses.
An example from the running system is::
{
"playbook_name": "compute*.ic.openstack.org:!disabled",
"host": "puppetmaster.openstack.org",
"stats": {
"unreachable": 0,
"skipped": 5,
"ok": 13,
"changed": 1,
"failures": 0
},
"playbook_id": "b259ac6d-6cb5-4403-bb8d-0ff2131c3d7a",
"ansible_host": "controller00.vanilla.ic.openstack.org"
}
Task Events
'''''''''''
The schema for tasks events is::
{
"status": <status>,
"host": <hostname>,
"ansible_host": <execute hostname>,
"session": <session id>,
"ansible_type": "task",
"playbook_name": <playbook name>,
"playbook_id": <playbook uuid>,
"ansible_task": <task name>,
"ansible_result": <ansible result>
}
``playbook uuid`` is the same field from the topic. ``playbook name`` is the
human readable name for the playbook. If one is set in the playbook this will be
that. ``execute hostname`` is the hostname where the tasks were being executed,
while ``hostname`` is the hostname where ansible launched the playbook. ``task
name``, like the name implies, is the human readable name of the task executed.
If one was specified in the playbook that will be the value. ``status`` is the
result of the task and will be one of the following:
* ``OK``
* ``FAILED``
* ``UNREACHABLE``
``session id`` is a UUID generated by the callback plugin to uniquely identify
the execution of the playbook.
``ansible result`` is a free form subdict that comes directly from ansible to
completely describe the task that just finished. The structure here is fully
dependent on ansible internals and the way that the task was invoked in the
playbook. Note, that sometimes this can be quite large in size depending on the
task and whether facts were enabled or not.
An example of a task event from the running system is::
{
"status": "OK",
"host": "puppetmaster.openstack.org",
"session": "092aa3fa-2c73-11e7-bd24-bc764e048db9",
"playbook_name": "compute*.ic.openstack.org:!disabled",
"ansible_result": {
"_ansible_parsed": true,
"_ansible_no_log": false,
"stdout": "",
"changed": false,
"stderr": "",
"rc": 0,
"invocation": {
"module_name": "puppet",
"module_args": {
"logdest": "syslog",
"execute": null,
"facter_basename": "ansible",
"tags": null,
"puppetmaster": null,
"show_diff": false,
"certname": null,
"manifest": "/opt/system-config/manifests/site.pp",
"environment": "production",
"debug": false,
"noop": false,
"timeout": "30m",
"facts": null
}
},
"stdout_lines": []
},
"ansible_type": "task",
"ansible_task": "TASK: puppet : run puppet",
"playbook_id": "b259ac6d-6cb5-4403-bb8d-0ff2131c3d7a",
"ansible_host": "compute014.chocolate.ic.openstack.org"
}
Logstash Workers
================
The messages for the subunit workers are generated directly in the
`logstash gearman worker scripts`_.
.. _logstash gearman worker scripts: https://opendev.org/opendev/puppet-log_processor/src/branch/master/files/log-gearman-worker.py
Topics
------
The topics for the subunit workers follow a simple pattern::
gearman-logstash/<worker hostname>/<git namespace>/<repo name>/<change number>/<action>
Where ``worker hostname`` is the host which processed the log file. The
``git namespace`` and ``repo name`` are pretty self explanatory, and are just
for the git repo under test that the log was generated. ``change number`` is
the gerrit change number for the job that launched the tests the subunit is for.
In the case of periodic or post queue jobs, this will either say ``periodic`` or
``post`` because there isn't an associated change number. The action field is
the phase of the log processing that just completed. Right now the only
possible value is ``retrieve_logs`` but there may be others in the future.
Payload
-------
The payload for the messages from the logstash workers is pretty straightforward
json that contains 3 fields: ``status``, ``build_uuid``, and ``source_url``.
An example is::
{
'status': 'success',
'build_uuid': '45f7c1ddbfd74c6aba94662623bd61b8'
'source_url': 'A url',
}

2
doc/source/systems.rst

@ -38,8 +38,6 @@ Major Systems
refstack
codesearch
signing
firehose
firehose_schema
github
activity
asterisk

1
hiera/common.yaml

@ -222,7 +222,6 @@ cacti_hosts:
- elasticsearch07.openstack.org
- ethercalc02.openstack.org
- etherpad01.opendev.org
- firehose01.openstack.org
- gitea-lb01.opendev.org
- gitea01.opendev.org
- gitea02.opendev.org

7
inventory/base/hosts.yaml

@ -154,13 +154,6 @@ all:
region_name: DFW
public_v4: 104.130.124.120
public_v6: 2001:4800:7818:104:be76:4eff:fe02:b0ff
firehose01.openstack.org:
ansible_host: 104.130.155.115
location:
cloud: openstackci-rax
region_name: DFW
public_v4: 104.130.155.115
public_v6: 2001:4800:7818:103:be76:4eff:fe04:40aa
gitea-lb01.opendev.org:
ansible_host: 38.108.68.124
location:

25
inventory/service/group_vars/firehose.yaml

@ -1,25 +0,0 @@
exim_local_domains: "@:firehose.openstack.org"
# TODO(jeblair): have the cyrus router check to see if there is a
# cyrus account.
exim_routers:
- dnslookup: '{{ exim_dnslookup_router }}'
- system_aliases: '{{ exim_system_aliases_router }}'
- cyrus: |
driver = accept
domains = +local_domains
local_part_suffix = +*
local_part_suffix_optional
transport = cyrus
- localuser: '{{ exim_localuser_router }}'
exim_transports:
- cyrus: |
driver = lmtp
socket = /var/run/cyrus/socket/lmtp
user = cyrus
batch_max = 35
iptables_extra_public_tcp_ports:
- 25
- 80
- 443
- 1883
- 8883

1
inventory/service/group_vars/graphite.yaml

@ -7,7 +7,6 @@ iptables_extra_allowed_hosts:
protocol: udp
iptables_extra_allowed_groups:
- {'protocol': 'udp', 'port': '8125', 'group': 'firehose'}
- {'protocol': 'udp', 'port': '8125', 'group': 'mirror-update'}
- {'protocol': 'udp', 'port': '8125', 'group': 'logstash'}
- {'protocol': 'udp', 'port': '8125', 'group': 'nodepool'}

1
inventory/service/group_vars/graphite_opendev.org

@ -7,7 +7,6 @@ iptables_extra_allowed_hosts:
protocol: udp
iptables_extra_allowed_groups:
- {'protocol': 'udp', 'port': '8125', 'group': 'firehose'}
- {'protocol': 'udp', 'port': '8125', 'group': 'mirror-update'}
- {'protocol': 'udp', 'port': '8125', 'group': 'logstash'}
- {'protocol': 'udp', 'port': '8125', 'group': 'nodepool'}

3
inventory/service/groups.yaml

@ -55,7 +55,6 @@ groups:
elasticsearch: elasticsearch[0-9]*.open*.org
ethercalc: ethercalc*.open*.org
etherpad: etherpad[0-9]*.open*.org
firehose: firehose[0-9]*.open*.org
gerrit:
- review[0-9]*.open*.org
gitea:
@ -138,7 +137,6 @@ groups:
- eavesdrop[0-9]*.open*.org
- elasticsearch[0-9]*.open*.org
- ethercalc[0-9]*.open*.org
- firehose[0-9]*.open*.org
- health[0-9]*.openstack.org
- lists*.katacontainers.io
- lists*.open*.org
@ -167,7 +165,6 @@ groups:
- eavesdrop[0-9]*.open*.org
- elasticsearch[0-9]*.open*.org
- ethercalc[0-9]*.open*.org
- firehose[0-9]*.open*.org
- health[0-9]*.openstack.org
- lists*.katacontainers.io
- lists*.open*.org

18
manifests/site.pp

@ -181,24 +181,6 @@ node /^elasticsearch\d+\.open.*\.org$/ {
}
}
# Node-OS: xenial
node /^firehose\d+\.open.*\.org$/ {
class { 'openstack_project::server': }
class { 'openstack_project::firehose':
gerrit_ssh_host_key => hiera('gerrit_ssh_rsa_pubkey_contents'),
gerrit_public_key => hiera('germqtt_gerrit_ssh_public_key'),
gerrit_private_key => hiera('germqtt_gerrit_ssh_private_key'),
mqtt_password => hiera('mqtt_service_user_password'),
ca_file => hiera('mosquitto_tls_ca_file'),
cert_file => hiera('mosquitto_tls_server_cert_file'),
key_file => hiera('mosquitto_tls_server_key_file'),
imap_hostname => hiera('lpmqtt_imap_server'),
imap_username => hiera('lpmqtt_imap_username'),
imap_password => hiera('lpmqtt_imap_password'),
statsd_host => 'graphite.opendev.org',
}
}
# A machine to run Storyboard
# Node-OS: xenial
node /^storyboard\d+\.opendev\.org$/ {

1
modules/openstack_project/files/ssl_cert_check/ssldomains

@ -9,7 +9,6 @@ docs.starlingx.io 443
ethercalc.openstack.org 443
etherpad.openstack.org 443
files.openstack.org 443
firehose.openstack.org 8883
git.airshipit.org 443
git.openstack.org 443
git.starlingx.io 443

87
modules/openstack_project/manifests/firehose.pp

@ -1,87 +0,0 @@
# Copyright 2016 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
#
# Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License"); you may
# not use this file except in compliance with the License. You may obtain
# a copy of the License at
#
# http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
#
# Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
# distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT
# WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied. See the
# License for the specific language governing permissions and limitations
# under the License.
#
# firehose glue class.
#
class openstack_project::firehose (
$gerrit_username = 'germqtt',
$gerrit_public_key,
$gerrit_private_key,
$gerrit_ssh_host_key,
$imap_username,
$imap_hostname,
$imap_password,
$mqtt_hostname = 'firehose.openstack.org',
$mqtt_password,
$mqtt_username = 'infra',
$statsd_host,
$ca_file,
$cert_file,
$key_file,
) {
include mosquitto
class {'mosquitto::server':
infra_service_username => $mqtt_username,
infra_service_password => $mqtt_password,
enable_tls => true,
enable_tls_websocket => true,
ca_file => $ca_file,
cert_file => $cert_file,
key_file => $key_file,
websocket_tls_port => 443,
}
include germqtt
class {'germqtt::server':
gerrit_username => $gerrit_username,
gerrit_public_key => $gerrit_public_key,
gerrit_private_key => $gerrit_private_key,
gerrit_ssh_host_key => $gerrit_ssh_host_key,
mqtt_username => $mqtt_username,
mqtt_password => $mqtt_password,
}
package {'cyrus-imapd':
ensure => latest,
}
package {'sasl2-bin':
ensure => latest,
}
package {'cyrus-admin':
ensure => latest,
}
service {'cyrus-imapd':
ensure => running,
}
include lpmqtt
class {'lpmqtt::server':
mqtt_username => $mqtt_username,
mqtt_password => $mqtt_password,
imap_hostname => $imap_hostname,
imap_username => $imap_username,
imap_password => $imap_password,
imap_use_ssl => false,
imap_delete_old => true,
}
include mqtt_statsd
class {'mqtt_statsd::server':
mqtt_hostname => $mqtt_hostname,
statsd_hostname => $statsd_host,
}
}

1
playbooks/group_vars/certcheck.yaml

@ -2,7 +2,6 @@ letsencrypt_certcheck_additional_domains:
- ask.openstack.org 443
- ethercalc.openstack.org 443
- etherpad.openstack.org 443
- firehose.openstack.org 8883
- git.openstack.org 443
- openstackid-dev.openstack.org 443
- openstackid.org 443

5
playbooks/roles/install-ansible/files/inventory_plugins/test-fixtures/results.yaml

@ -13,11 +13,6 @@ results:
- afs-client
- kerberos-client
firehose01.openstack.org:
- firehose
- puppet
- puppet4
graphite02.opendev.org:
- graphite
- letsencrypt

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